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Beryl Ivey Woods

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This 50-acre property located in the Municipality of Southwest Middlesex is part of the Skunk's Misery Natural Area. Several species which are characteristic of Carolinian habitat such as Sassafras and Tulip Tree occur at this site. Many species of ash, oak, and maple are commonly found here as well. Species-at-risk found at this property include Eastern Flowering Dogwood, Butternut, and American Chestnut. Cerulean Warbler, Prothonotary Warbler, and Acadian Flycatcher have been documented on adjacent properties in the Skunk's Misery Natural Area.

With your help we've raised 100% of the funds necessary to protect this property in perpetuity. Click here to see a list of campaign supporters. 

Join us to celebrate! 

 


Bebensee Tract

Bebensee swampThe Bebensee Tract was gifted to the TTLT in May, 2014 by Elaine Bebensee of Calgary in memory of her husband Lloyd Bebensee, both of whom grew up near Skunk's Misery.

The Bebensee Tract is a 26-ha (64 acre) wooded property within the Skunk's Misery swamp forest complex, one of the largest remnant Carolinian forest blocks in southwestern Ontario. At over 1200-ha in size, Skunk's Misery is designated as a provincial Life Sciences Area of Natural and Scientific Interest, a Carolinian Canada Signature Site and a Bird Studies Canada Important Bird Area. The property is bordered by large forested tracts owned and managed by the County of Middlesex and the Lower Thames Valley Conservation Authority.

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Blain Farm

Blain_Farm_53.JPGLocated in the Municipality of West Elgin, just west of Wardsville, Blain Farm was purchased in 2009 from Wilbert and Eleanor Blain, who had farmed the land for over 70 years.

Blain Farm lies within the Skunk's Misery Natural Area as designated by the Nature Conservancy of Canada. It is located one kilometre south of Skunk's Misery Forest, one of the region's most important natural areas.

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Black Creek Heronry

Black_Creek_Swamp.JPGThe Black Creek Heronry in East Perth County has been the breeding grounds for a large colony of Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) for at least 30 years.It is one of only two heronries in Perth County and is thus the source for these well-loved and majestic birds through much of Perth County.

In order to breed successfully Herons require a wetland in which they will be undisturbed, and this has become an increasingly rare habitat.

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Eberhardt Easement

Eberhardt ForestIn February 2005 the Thames Talbot Land Trust entered into its first conservation easement agreement – the Eberhardt Easement. 

In signing this agreement, Eric and Marsha Eberhardt sought to fulfill the wishes of Hamitage Richardson who entrusted the property to their care. The Richardson family began the work of restoring the site which was, by all accounts, particularly barren at the turn of the century.

 

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Five Points Forest

Five Points ForestFive Points Forest was donated to the Thames Talbot Land Trust in 2009 by Al and Lilianne Driedger, who wanted to protect the natural features of the land in perpetuity.

The 29-ha (73-acre) property lies on a gently rolling moraine just south of the south branch of the Thames River between Putnam and Ingersoll, adjacent to other woodland patches.

Five Points Forest consists of mixed coniferous-deciduous upland forest and forest swamp.

Its low-lying areas were farmed until the 1940s and 1950s and then abandoned. These areas have reforested naturally but also include some older coniferous plantings including White Pine, Scotch Pine and Larch.

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Hawk Cliff Woods


HCW_forest_by_John_St._Pierre.jpgHawk Cliff Woods is a stunning 230 acre property fronting on Lake Erie near Port Stanley. The woodland here is one of the most significant deep interior forests in Elgin County. In the maple-beech forest you will find Carolinian specialties, including the Tulip-tree and Shagbark Hickory as well as the Endangered Butternut and American Chestnut. Rare birds such as Eastern Wood-Pewee, Acadian Flycatcher, Louisiana Waterthrush, and Wood Thrush thrive in the deep woods.

 Hawk Cliff Woods Trail Guide

 

 

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Joany's Woods

Joanys WoodsJoany's Woods was purchased by the Thames Talbot Land Trust on September 28, 2007 following a nine month fundraising campaign that raised $660,000 for the purchase and stewardship of this remarkable site.

Joany's Woods is a 148-ha (367-acre) parcel of land located on parts of Lots 17, 18 and 20 and all of lot 19 in broken Front Concession, West Williams Ward, Municipality of North Middlesex, Middlesex County in Southwestern Ontario.

 

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Lusty Family Woods

DGW_5661_Lusty_resized_medium.jpgThe Lusty Family Tract is a 21-ha (53-acre) parcel of spectacular Carolinian swamp forest which lies at the heart of the West Lorne Woods in the Municipality of West Elgin. The West Lorne Woods is 600 acres of almost continuous deciduous forest. Its mix of swamp forest and upland woods creates habitat for a rich array of Carolinian species. Check out pictures of this beautiful property here.

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McTavish Tract

McTavish TractThe McTavish Tract is part of a larger property that was settled by Alexander McTavish in 1836.

The farm remained in the McTavish family until 1965, when it was sold by Donald McTavish. A long-time conservationist, Donald had the foresight to sever the wooded tract from the original farm, retaining ownership for the McTavish family. His children Stuart, Robert, Murray, Hugh, Laura, Marian and Donna decided to protect the property in perpetuity by transferring the title to the Thames Talbot Land Trust in 2008.

 

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Meadowlily Nature Preserve

Walking bridge in Meadowlily Nature Preserve

On October 20, 2002, the Meadowlily Nature Preserve became the first property dedicated to the Thames Talbot Land Trust. 

Located within the City of London, on the south side of the Thames River between Highbury Avenue and Meadowlily Road, it was donated to TTLT by Carol and Rick Richardson, who wanted to ensure that their family's land would be protected from future development.

The 5.9-ha (14.5 acre) site is comprised of floodplain, open meadow and upland forest, and is an integral component of Meadowlily Woods, which is recognized as an Environmentally Significant Area (ESA) by the City of London.

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Newport Forest

Newport MertensiaThe title to Newport Forest was transferred from Omnibus Research Inc. to the Thames Talbot Land Trust in June 2007. 

The 44.5-ha (110 acre) site is located on the south side of the Thames River near Wardsville, Ontario within the Deciduous Forest Zone. Historically, it is ecologically contiguous with the Skunk's Misery area on the north side of the Thames, barely one kilometer's distance over intervening agricultural land.

Newport Forest consists of lowland forest, with some upland forest (the Hogsback), meadow, ravine slopes and bluff forests, and floodplain. 

 

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Tanager Tract

2015-05-21_14.46.51.jpgOn November 1, 2010, with generous support from nature organizations, charitable foundations and more than 160 individuals, the Thames Talbot Land Trust was able to purchase the Tanager Tract, a 40-ha tract of Carolinian hardwood forest near West Lorne in West Elgin.

 

 

 

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Tiedje Woods

Tjiedge forestTiedje Woods was donated to the Thames Talbot land Trust in April of 2009 by John and Dorothy Tiedje of Sarnia. As life-long naturalists, the Tiedjes had purchased the property 20 years previously in order to enjoy and protect its natural features. It is now a natural legacy, entrusted to the TTLT.

 

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Wardsville Woods

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Wardsville Woods is a 20 ha (50 acre) tract of upland and ravine forest located in the Skunk's Misery Natural Area (SMNA), a 35 km2 mosaic of mature Carolinian forest and productive farmland.

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